1. Avoid Cutting Your Grass Too Short – A scalped lawn is vulnerable to diseases and weed infestation. Scalped turf tends to be weak and sparse, which exposes soil. One of the No. 1 contributors to weed success is exposed soil that allows weed seed to take root. A sparse lawn also lets sunlight reach weed seedlings and give them a boost. Grass that’s consistently cut too short has a poorly developed root system, which makes the lawn more susceptible to serious damage from drought or high temperatures.

2. Keep Your Mower Blade Sharp – A sharp blade cuts grass cleanly, while a dull blade tears grass, creating a jagged, uneven edge. These tears create openings for pests and diseases to enter grass blades. A lawn that has been cut with a dull blade develops a whitish or brown hue as the tips of individual grass blades die back. Sharpen blades at least a few times during the mowing season. Avoid mowing over thick branches or stones to reduce blade dulling or even damage.

3. Mow When Grass Is Dry – Mowing a wet lawn doesn’t harm the grass, but it doesn’t yield the best results. Wet grass fills and clogs a mower deck. It also has a tendency to fall over and clump together as you mow, creating an uneven cut. Watch for clumps of wet grass that fall off the mower. Remove these from the lawn after mowing to avoid killing grass. Always avoid mowing in soggy soil, or you risk creating wheel ruts and tearing up grass. If you must mow the lawn when it’s damp, treat the underside of your mower with oil or silicone spray to help prevent grass from sticking. Also, make sure your mower blade is sharp to avoid ripping grass out of soil.

4. Roll Wheel on Edging – Create a flat edging along your lawn beside driveways, walks and planting areas. When mowing, roll a wheel of the mower on this edging, and you’ll never have to string trim edges. Use any number of materials to create your edging, including bricks, gravel, concrete pavers or tightly packed crushed limestone, like crusher run.

Source: diynetwork.com

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